'Emotional service peacock' denied seat on flight

Feathered friend This is Dexter the peacock whose owner a Brooklyn artist had attempted to take him on board a United Airlines flight as an emotional support animal but was denied

Feathered friend This is Dexter the peacock whose owner a Brooklyn artist had attempted to take him on board a United Airlines flight as an emotional support animal but was denied

United Airlines denied a woman's efforts to bring a peacock onto a flight departing from Newark Liberty International Airport, according to the travel blog Live and Let's Fly.

United told NBC News that the woman was barred from the flight as the peacock did not meet meet guidelines such as weight and size.

"Unfortunately, untrained animals can lead to safety issues for our team, our passengers and working dogs onboard our aircraft", the airline said in a statement.

Some of them said that United Airlines should have allowed the traveller to board her flight with her peacock while others called the incident ridiculous.

According to Fox News, the airline is working on updating its stance on emotional support animals policy.

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The airline also said it requires passengers to "provide documentation from a medical professional and at least 48 hours' advance notice" before bringing an emotional-support animal onto a flight.

If you are an "emotional support animal" that accompanies your owner on airline flights, your traveling days might be cut short in the future. In response, Delta is imposing new, stricter regulations around emotional support animals beginning March 1. But airlines have some latitude to deny boarding to certain "unusual" service animals, including snakes, other reptiles, ferrets, rodents and spiders.

Stories abound of scenes seemingly out of a parody movie; a duck wandering around an airline aisle; a flight attendant who said that they were asked to administer oxygen to a dog its owner claimed was having an anxiety attack midflight. The woman was eventually asked to leave the plane, pig in tow. Also in 2017, Delta employees reported increased acts of aggression, including barking, growling, lunging and biting, from service and support animals - behavior not typically seen in properly trained animals. "Ignoring the true intent of existing rules governing the transport of service and support animals can be a disservice to customers who have real and documented needs".

"I've actually not had a situation where we had something go terribly awry with an emotional support animal, aside from a cat". One passenger had been reportedly mauled by an emotional-support dog, according to Business Insider.

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