Trump administration to freeze fuel efficiency requirements

Trump proposes car-mileage rollback states sue in protest

Trump proposes car-mileage rollback states sue in protest

Federal data show the increased cost consumers would pay for the more efficient vehicles is dwarfed by the amount of money they would save at the pump, undermining the argument that drivers will stay in older, unsafe vehicles, advocates for the tougher rules say.

The Obama-era rules also drove vehicle prices higher, since prior estimates fell short of what incremental improvements to fuel efficiency actually cost.

The Obama administration had planned to keep toughening fuel requirements through 2026, saying those and other regulations on vehicles would save 40,000 lives annually through cleaner air.

Schwarzenegger weighed in shortly after the Trump administration announced that it would move to roll back former President Obama's fuel economy and global warming standards for cars. Consumers Union, the advocacy division of Consumer Reports, said consumers could save between $3,200 per auto and $4,800 per truck over the life of the vehicle under that standard, and that they would save even more if gas prices go up. Before a crowd of autoworkers assembled at a decommissioned auto factory, Trump said "we're going to work on the CAFE standards so you can make cars in America again".

While many carmakers have touted their development of more efficient cars, including electric vehicles, auto lobbyists were quick to get assurances from the Trump administration that the more stringent rules would be dismantled.

Now, the Trump administration is proposing to flatline fuel economy and tailpipe carbon dioxide emission standards from 2021 to 2026, locking models produced during those years to standards pegged to 2020.

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The changes are considered massive regulatory rollbacks of Obama administration policies that argued requiring more fuel efficient vehicles would improve public health, combat climate change and save consumers money without compromising safety.

"For 48 years - since one of my heroes, then-governor Ronald Reagan, requested it- California has had a waiver from the federal government to clean our own air", Schwarzenegger said in a statement released on Twitter.

"My job as the state's attorney general is to protect my state's rights and interests and the environmental rights of all Pennsylvanians", Shapiro said. Some of the states poised to join the suit, including Pennsylvania, adhere to California's stricter standards. The proportion of passengers killed in cars that are older than 18 years is nearly double that of cars that are newer than three years, according to a recent National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) study. At least twelve other states and the District of Columbia follow California's rules. But any plans to freeze clean air rules and strip California of its power to set its own rules is drawing fire from members of both parties. He added "The California Department of Justice will use every legal tool at its disposal to defend today's national standards and reaffirm the science behind them". "We urge California and the federal government to find a common sense solution that sets continued increases in vehicle efficiency standards while also meeting the needs of America's drivers".

According to the EPA's estimates, leaving fuel economy regulations are their current levels would prevent $1,850 in higher vehicle costs due to mitigating increases in technology costs.

In 2012, when the standards were first adopted, cars were about 50 per cent of new-vehicle sales.

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