Urgent Action Needed to Avoid 'Unthinkable' Damage from Climate Change

A mix of live and dead coral in one of the outer reefs near Port Douglas in Queensland Australia. The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concluded in a major report released yesterday that deep emission cuts are needed before

A mix of live and dead coral in one of the outer reefs near Port Douglas in Queensland Australia. The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concluded in a major report released yesterday that deep emission cuts are needed before

To slash that to less than 1.5C as laid out in the Paris agreement will require "rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society".

Mr. Apollos Nwafor, Pan Africa Director of Oxfam International (Oxfam.org) said: "Climate change has set our planet on fire, millions are already feeling the impacts, and the IPCC just showed that things can get much worse".

In order to limit temperature rise to 1.5°C, by 2050, coal electricity generation would need to be reduced to 0-2% of global generation.

Holthaus also tweeted that he is available to lend his expertise to "any TV/radio news program this week to put this report in its appropriate context" - but with a special exemption for Fox News due to their not accepting science.

"Limiting global warming to 1.5 °C compared with 2 °C would reduce challenging impacts on ecosystems, human health and well-being, making it easier to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals", said Priyardarshi Shukla, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group III.

Green Car Reports respectfully reminds its readers that the scientific validity of climate change is not a topic for debate in our comments.

This weekend in Korea the IPCC approved the latest special report advising global governments to hold warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

This means that any remaining emissions would need to be balanced by removing Carbon dioxide from the air.

The IPCC report noted the world is rapidly losing any chance to limit average temperature increase to 1.5 degrees, though there is still a theoretical chance if the political will existed.

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Lowering emissions to this degree, while technically possible, would require widespread changes in energy, industry, buildings, transportation and cities, according to the report.

- It will require a huge ramp-up in renewables so they generate 70-85% of electricity supplies by 2050, while coal power's share of the mix tumbles to nearly nothing.

According to scientific predictions laid out in the report, this amount of warming would likely make extremely hot days both more common and more severe, thus increasing the incidence of forest fires and heat-related deaths.

"Every extra bit of warming matters, especially since warming of 1.5°C or higher increases the risk associated with long-lasting or irreversible changes, such as the loss of some ecosystems", Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group II Hans-Otto Pörtner said.

This report shows the longer we leave it to act, the more hard, the more expensive and the more unsafe it will be. "It is now clear that we lost more than 10 years already and the question is about how disastrous will it be in the end".

We have seen numerous reports about the irreparable damage being done to coral reefs across the world, with warming temperatures and pollution leading to mass bleaching in many parts of the world's oceans.

Professor Corinne Le Quere, from the University of East Anglia, said: "For the United Kingdom, this means a rapid switch to renewable energy and electric cars, insulating our homes, planting trees, where possible walking or cycling and eating well - more plants and less meat - and developing an industry to capture carbon and store it underground".

While more than 180 countries have accepted the report's summary, the U.S. (which is the second biggest emitter in the world) said that their acceptance of the report does not "imply endorsement" of the findings.

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